Primary Reader – Week 2 readings

In Natalia Molina’s Fit to be Citizens? we see how racialization plays a role in public health and policies, immigration and public perception. In Los Angeles, officials used public health to further racial divides and perpetuate racial stereotypes; this racialization was also have been exacerbated by the conditions of a growing city. In Omi and […]

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Primary Reader: Molina and Omi

Both articles by Molina and Omi for this week relate race to the idea of citizenship. Molina in her introduction of her book ‘Fit to be Citizens’ specifically talks about the idea of ‘Race’ and ‘Public Health’ in the city of Los Angeles. She in the introduction focus primarily focuses on this issue from 1879-1939. […]

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Researcher#02

According to Omi and Winant, race is not just a socially constructed identity. It is a social concept that based on social, economic and institutional forces. Also, race was the means for separating minority groups and justifying the inequality and moreover racial classification through out the history of mankind.     http://www.alternet.org/speakeasy/chaunceydevega/are-chechens-really-white-racial-formation-theory-and-boston-marathon   The link above […]

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Researcher : Nayan Shah’s article.

https://web.archive.org/web/20131122220657/http://library.thinkquest.org/20619/Chinese.html This article provides the history of Chinese immigration and the creation of the first Chinatown in San Francisco. It also includes two black and white photos; first one shows the overcrowded situation Nayan Shah has talked about which led to the danger of health issues. The second images shows the Promontory Point at Central Pacific Railroad […]

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Researcher | Orientalism & Politics of Knowledge

The first photo is a cartoon that depicts the unhygienic, crowded conditions Chinese immigrants had to endure, contrary to other ethnic groups. The caption for the half of the cartoon says  “Why they can live on 40 cents a day” and on the right, the caption is “and they can’t”. I think these captions further elaborate on […]

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Primary Reader – June 5th Readings

In Nayan Shah’s “Public Health and The Mapping of Chinatown,” he comes to the conclusion that “The Chinese were characterized repeatedly in terms of ‘excess’ – of their number, of their living densities, of the diseases they spawned, and of the waste they produced” (173). I do not find this conclusion during the start of the Chinatown […]

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