Primary Reader: Discourses of Exclusion

Today’s three reading assignments examine the travails of the Asian American experience from different, complementary angles, which is good, because we don’t want to keep reading the same thing over and again. These 3 readings contribute to our perception of how discourses can coalesce into disciplines, thus increasing our theoretical understanding. For example, readings with […]

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Primary Reader for 6/12

In “The ‘Yellow Peril’ and Asian Exclusion in the Americas,” author Erika Lee investigates the way Asian peoples have immigrated to the Americas since the 19th century and explores anti-Asian sentiment in the Americas, particularly the labeling of South/East Asians, and specifically Japanese people as the “Yellow Peril” in the early 1900s.  What I found […]

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Primary Reader – Week 2 readings

In Natalia Molina’s Fit to be Citizens? we see how racialization plays a role in public health and policies, immigration and public perception. In Los Angeles, officials used public health to further racial divides and perpetuate racial stereotypes; this racialization was also have been exacerbated by the conditions of a growing city. In Omi and […]

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Primary Reading, 6/5/13 (Said & Shah)

The texts of “Introduction” by Edawrd Said and “Public Health and the Mapping of Chinatown” by Nyan Shah bring forth the volatile relationship seen between the Asian and Western cultures. Both texts present the Western culture as having an overbearing ideology that rejects and steps on anything that it does not support while exaggerating on […]

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Primary Reader – Said and Shah’s Orientalism and Politics of Knowledge

The readings we have to read before class is the introduction from Orientalism by Edward Said and “Public Health and the Mapping of Chinatown” by Nyan Shah.  These two readings shared the ideas of how Asians or Chinese were viewed by the Europeans and White Caucasians during the 19th century.  Medias and literature were being […]

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