Researcher for 7/10

http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/articles/pages/5968/THE-SHIFT-TOWARD-RACIALIZATION.html The above article elaborates on the racialization of Arab women in America both currently and 30+years back.  It makes an interesting point about the relation between religion and race (namely racism’s conflation of ‘Arab’ and ‘Muslim’), saying that Arab Americans have faced plenty of racism since before the majority of Arab American immigrants were […]

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Primary Reader 7/3

The Parrenas article discusses female Filipino-American immigrants in domestic labor (as the name implies) and examines their place in American society based mostly on interviews that the Author had with female Filipino domestic workers.  The paper spends a bit examining their common place in domestic labor, and how their handling of reproductive labor for richer […]

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Researcher for 7/1

http://www.justice.gov/crt/legalinfo/discrimupdate.php The above link seemed relevant to Junaid Rana’s paper. It doesn’t present any surprising ideas, and doesn’t even necessarily focus on Asians, but I chose this article because it seemed relevant to the paper by giving accounts of the sort of hate crimes and discrimination that American muslims were subjected to post 9-11.  By […]

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Researcher for 6/19

http://www.cis.org/1965ImmigrationAct-MassImmigration Like many of the analyses I could find online, the above defends the Immigration Act of 1965, discussed extensively in the Lowe piece.  I thought this one was worth posting because it contains several quotes from American politicians, illustrating the controversy that surrounded the bill.  While the Lowe piece gives the opinion of one […]

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Primary Reader for 6/12

In “The ‘Yellow Peril’ and Asian Exclusion in the Americas,” author Erika Lee investigates the way Asian peoples have immigrated to the Americas since the 19th century and explores anti-Asian sentiment in the Americas, particularly the labeling of South/East Asians, and specifically Japanese people as the “Yellow Peril” in the early 1900s.  What I found […]

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On "7/8 Primary Reader"

I think Gloria covered the main point of today's readings and what ties them all together--the way Asian American movements were heavily influenced by these other movements at the time (1960s through the '90s). Like other non-African American minority movements at the time, Asian American movements were heavily influenced by the more popular black civil rights movement (1956-1968). As covered by some of the readings from last week, Asian Americans had to deal with the stigma of "communist" even more so than other minority groups at the time due to the prevalence of communism in many parts of Asia. Gloria also focused on a point I found to be particularly interesting too, the influence of Malcolm X on the Asian American side of the civil rights movement. I think that the popularity of Malcolm X's teachings over those of MLK with the Asian American side of the civil rights movement crushes the model minority myth and the stereotype that Asian Americans would be more timid and politically quiet than other minorities. The Omatsu article really outed all such stereotypes without having to attack them directly. This unrecognized pride and strength is mirrored in Bruce Lee's decision (Prashad's article) and the adaptability and persistence of Asian communities (Aguirre's article), both brought up in Gloria's post.

On "Primary Reader on Lisa Lowe and Leti Volpp"

[continued] I also understand how the construction of a Vietnam War memorial designed by an Asian American could raise unease (which is not to say that I agree with that unease, but that I understand that some people would think that way), and I think that that unease exposes a lot about the nature of racism--that a conflict with a single nation in Asia could translate into racism against all Asians shows how thoughtless yet impactful it can really be. In the second paragraph I realized an interesting conundrum. If true citizenship is considered to include being active in politics, then while Asian Americans were held above other minorities to some degree by the model minority myth, they would have to choose to defy the myth by not being politically quiet if they want to be true citizens. So in a sense, Asian Americans would have to choose between being unaccepted in one way or another. Lastly, I'd be interested to read more about the shift from Yellow Peril to Model Minority that is mentioned at the end of the original post, and how the fluid shift could have resulted in a mixing of the two.

On "Primary Reader on Lisa Lowe and Leti Volpp"

I enjoyed reading this particular Primary Reader because it brought up a few points that I overlooked in reading the two papers. I'm curious how feminism may have influenced the issue of marrying into or out of citizenship by gender over the years. I also understand

On "Primary Reader – Ono & Pham, Lee, Jun"

I found it interesting to see that many of the stereotypes of Asians that this post took from "The Persistence of Yellow Peril Discourse" are the same as stereotypes of other minority groups in America. To me, this implies that many of the fears of growing minority groups spring simply from their being viewed as a threat to the established culture, and not from any specific cultural differences. This understanding could help us predict how the same scenarios will play out in the future. The point from "The ‘Yellow Peril’ and Asian Exclusion in the Americas" about the US interning Japanese living in other countries somewhat brings to mind the modern controversy over places like the Guantanamo Bay detention camp. While the US could not get away with shoveling away masses based on ancestry, it does continue to detain individuals from anywhere in the world without proper charges and without due process in the name of national security. My last point is to ask whether similar action has ever been taken by other partially-assimilated races against more "foreign" races in America, and whether there is a pattern of this use of one racism to fight racism in American history.

On "Primary Reader | Racial Formation, the State, Capital"

While I agree along with Atitaya that race is "an element of social structure rather than an irregularity within it," I feel that Molina's article handled the treatment of race in the US without discriminating enough between race and culture, as did Americans at the time she writes about. I think it's worth pointing out that the quote used from Charles Murray ties in with Tomas Almageur's point (from Molina's article) that groups were racialized in relation to one another and the concept of intersectionality. So, the underlying conflict for immigrants like those in Los Angeles was between their home culture and American culture, but their American-ness was similarly diminished due to the frailty in human nature that lead to their being grouped by race--a convenient but unfair and unreliable heuristic. The latter half of this post points out what I believe to be the result of this kind of racialization, the mistreatment of certain peoples because of the belief that they are intrinsically inferior. The dramatic decrease of the Chinese population in the county coincides with an even larger increase in the Chinese population in the city, this could have something to do with that shift taking place between 1930 and 1940, a time of frequent migration within the United States as people searched for jobs in the midst of the Great Depression. Historically immigrants to America have been pushed by mainstream American culture to Assimilate, but usually ultimately integrate. Immigrants conform in some ways and in others retain their culture and instead change American culture. While I might be biased to say so as a New Yorker, in my opinion the give-and-take of integration is superior to purging immigrants' native culture and keeping American culture steady and sterile.